Coins Mark 50th Anniversary of China and France Diplomatic Relations

Gold and silver collectors coins have been issued by the Monnaie de Paris and China Gold Coin Incorporation to mark the 50th anniversary of diplomatic relations between France and China. Each of the coins brings together sights and symbols from the two countries.

France China 50 Years of Diplomatic Relations Silver Proof Coin

The gold and silver coins from the Monnaie de Paris share a common design and were released earlier this year. The obverse carries depictions recognizable monuments from each country placed within circular areas created within the numerals of “50”. The Arc de Triomphe in Paris represents France and the Temple of Heaven in Beijing represents China. The anniversary dates of “1964-2014” appear above. An inscription on the French side includes the motto “Liberty, Equality, Fraternity”, and on the Chinese side “Go forth, go forth, go forth” from the country’s national anthem.

The reverse design carries a depiction of the flags of each county linked by their heraldic colors with both red parts in the same continuous vertical pattern. An inscription reads “50th anniversary of French-Chinese diplomatic relations” in both French and Chinese.

The silver proof version of the coin with a denomination of 10 euros is struck in 90% purity with a weight of 22.20 grams and diameter of 37 mm. The maximum mintage is 8,888 pieces. The gold proof version sharing the same design has a denomination of 50 euros and is struck in 92% purity with a weight of 8.45 grams and diameter of 22 mm. With a mintage of 888 pieces, the coin sold out after about five months.

China 2014 50th Anniverasry of Diplomatic Relations China and France Silver Coin

The more recently released silver coin from China has a design which also uses stylized numerals from “50” to create sections for symbols from each county. On the left side is a depiction of the Gallic Rooster and the Eiffel Tower. Appearing on the right side is the Temple of Heaven and a traditional Chinese Dragon. Inscriptions in French and Chinese read “The 50th anniversary of diplomatic relations between the Republic of France and the People’s Republic of China”.

The obverse design features the national emblem with inscriptions of the country name and year.

The silver proof coins carry a denomination of 10 Yuan and are struck in 99.9% purity with a weight of 31.104 grams and diameter of 40 mm. The mintage is 10,000 pieces.

China 2014 50th Anniverasry of Diplomatic Relations China and France Gold Coin

The gold proof coin from China carries the image of the Hall of Supreme Harmony, the largest hall within the Forbidden City, and the French Louvre. The obverse carries the national emblem with the country name and year.

The gold coins carry a denomination of 100 yuan and are struck in 99.9% purity with a weight of 7.776 grams and diameter of 22 mm. The mintage for the gold coin, which seems to be available within a two coin proof set with the silver version, is 3,000.

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Comments

  1. Koichi Ito says

    Too bad for me because my last order coin from Monnaie de Paris was sent back. So I cannot wait to see next Latvian silver commemorative coins.

  2. Louis says

    The French one is very nice and reasonably priced.
    The Chinese one costs at least 3 times as much.
    I am referring to silver versions.

  3. F Santis says

    Speaking of the Monnaie de Paris, what’s up with this “Monaco 10 Euro 2014 Hercules with bow and arrow” I’m seeing in various places?

    The prices for this fairly unremarkable coin make an inflated Ebay Poseidon look reasonable. Why is that?

  4. Louis says

    It is not French, it is from Monaco, though their coins are minted by the French mint. Monaco coins have small mintages, which are used by dealers to push prices sky high. A bimetal coin for Princess Grace of Monaco from 10 years ago is worth $2K and was probably $100 when issued.

  5. F Santis says

    Thanks.
    It did stand out while I was trying to make sense of the weird proportions used for Hercules and the bow he seems to have borrowed from a small child.
    I’m sure there’s an arrow in there somewhere. But I’ll be damned if I can find it.

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