Summary of Queen Elizabeth II Coronation 60th Anniversary Coins

There have been a multitude of coins issued to mark the 60th anniversary of the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II. This includes gold, silver, and base metal coins issued in the United Kingdom, the Commonwealth realms, and British territories and dependencies.

Many of these coins have been covered in previous articles either here or on Coin Update News, but I thought it would be useful to provide a summary post with images and basic information on all of the issues that I have seen during the course of the year.

uk-crown

Location: United Kingdom
Design: Imperial State Crown
Denomination: £5 issued in cupronickel, platinum piedfort, gold, silver plated gold, silver, and silver piedfort.

kilo

Location: United Kingdom
Design: Coronation regalia including St. Edwards Crown, the Orb and Scepter, floral symbols of the four nations of the British Isles, rose in bloom symbolizing Queen Elizabeth II.
Denomination: £500 for silver kilo version, £1000 for gold kilo version

5-oz

Location: United Kingdom
Design: Coronation regalia in Westminster Abbey.
Denomination: £10 for 5 oz silver and 5 oz gold coins

queen-portrait

Location: United Kingdom
Design: The four portraits of Queen Elizabeth II used for circulating coinage in the United Kingdom. The reverse features a rendition of the Royal Arms
Denomination: £5 available in gold, silver, and piedfort silver

coronation-silver-coin

Location: Australia (Perth Mint)
Design: The official Coronation portrait by Sir Cecil Beaton in color.
Denomination: 1 Dollar (1 oz silver)

coronation-gold-coin

Location: Australia (Perth Mint)
Design: Queen Elizabeth II in ceremonial regalia
Denomination: 25 Dollars (1/4 oz gold)

275-crown

Location: Australia (Perth Mint)
Design: Crown worn for the Coronation ceremony. Issued within The Queen’s Coronation 2013 Stamp and Coin Cover, which includes a second 1 Dollar aluminum bronze coin for the 175th Anniversary of the Coronation of Queen Victoria.
Denomination: 1 Dollar aluminum bronze

elizabeth-canada

Location: Canada
Design: The official Coronation portrait by Sir Cecil Beaton in color. The first coin from the Royal Canadian Mint with colored details over an engraved design.
Denomination: 50 Dollars (5 oz silver)

rcm-2

Location: Canada
Design: Based on the official portrait of Queen Elizabeth II in celebration of her Diamond Jubilee
Denomination: 25 Cents in cupro-nickel

ramint

Location: Australia (Royal Australian Mint)
Design: Abstracted St. Edward’s Crown
Denomination: 50 Cents in cupro-nickel or silver

purple-crown

Location: Australia (Royal Australian Mint)
Design: Three regal purple concentric stripes around St. Edward’s Crown
Denomination: 2 Dollars in Aluminum Bronze, issued for circulation

nz

Location: New Zealand
Design: Official portraits of Queen Elizabeth II that have appeared on New Zealand coinage.
Denomination: $1 (1 oz silver)

iot-580x287

Location: British Indian Ocean Territory
Design: Westminster Cathedral
Denomination: Two Pounds in cupro-nickel or silver

ascension-580x288

Location: Ascension Island
Design: St. Edward’s Crown surrounded by elements of a rose for England, a Leek for Wales, a thistle for Scotland, a shamrock for Ireland
Denomination:1 Crown in cupro-nickel or silver

falkland1-580x287

Location: Falkland Islands
Design: Queen Elizabeth II as portrayed in 1953, surrounded by a garland of acorns and diamonds
Denomination: One Crown in cupro-nickel or silver

iom-580x290

Location: Isle of Man
Design: Queen Elizabeth II with husband and two children on the balcony of Buckingham Palace
Denomination: One Crown in cupro-nickel or silver

georgia-sandwich-580x290

Location: South Georgia & South Sandwich Islands
Design: Queen Elizabeth II in 1953 holding orb and scepter with diamond and rays below
Denomination: Two Pounds in cupro-nickel or silver

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Comments

  1. VABEACHBUM says

    Thanks for the summary, Michael. Between the Jubilee last year and the Coronation this year, there certainly have been a lot of commemoratives issued throughout the Empire.

    I recently acquired an example of the Imperial State Crown Silver Piedfort. Hefty w/ a solid strike; a very nice piece. The downside is the Sterling Alloy – 0.925 – in the Piedfort coin. I hope the RM capsule is hermetically sealed, ’cause the copper in that alloy will tone and stain very quickly. Britannia Silver would have been better, although it, too, is susseptible to accelerated toning.

  2. fmtransmitter says

    Thanks for the summary, Michael. Great work. I always use the after market air tites to transfer OGP coins, seems to work great to avoid tarnish of any metal.

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